Super Satire: Sicario Day Of The Soldado

“Sicario: Day of The Soldado” is a remarkable film on many angles. Firstly, a lot of people myself included, would think that the movie is a sequel to the first Sicario movie when, in fact, it’s an alternative script that was drafted at the same time as the original movie. Yes, you read that correctly, Soldado is simply an alternative version of the first film. While that’s pretty simple to say – the idea of it being shot and given a wide release is so rare as to confuse movie-goers even when they read what I just wrote.

Yes, Soldado is the darker, alternative, to the first Sicario movie. It is a movie devoid of light and of hope. Emily Blunt, who’s FBI agent was the moral compass of the first film, is completely missing. Leaving Josh Brolin’s “Matt Graves” and Benecio Del Toro’s “Alejandro Gillick” to reign without any restrictions on their actions. The result is a film of rare darkness and satire, but one that ultimately leaves us wanting just a little bit more.

The movie opens with Islamic terrorists completing an attack that saw them smuggled by Mexican “Coyotes” (IE. people-smugglers) through the Southern border. This major attack gives the USA reason to authorize black ops to ignite a war between the now-stabilized Mexican drug cartels. The idea of this is when the cartels fight each other, they would be weaker for the USA to take out later.

**Spoilers follow this point**

In the beginning, all goes to plan. But the shit hits the fan when during one operation inside Mexico, a Mexican Federali SWAT team fires upon the Americans and is massacred by them in response. You can’t blame the Americans but the results are what they are. This creates a situation where Matt Graves has to turn on Alejandro who’s forced to try to sneak back across the border with a drug lord’s daughter. This same drug lord who happened to kill his family.

The action is good, there are some gory scenes particularly of Alejandro who survives an assassination attempt with a bullet wound to the head that offers up a lot of realistic blood and gore in spades. The action, like in the first film is tight. I particularly liked one mid-movie gun battle being shown from the perspective of the terrified drug lord’s daughter – “Isabela” – played by an actress named Isabela Moner. This actress acts surprisingly well for her age in her first scene, following a schoolyard fist fight. Josh Brolin and Benecio Del Toro clearly like their characters and deliver well as actors. The problem with the movie is that it’s a bit confusing and doesn’t give the payoff needed insofar as action.

The confusion is simply what I stated at the start of this article: Soldado is an alternative version of the first script, it is not a true sequel. If you know that, the movie falls into place, if you don’t, you don’t understand why certain scenes, lines, or decisions exist. The lack of payoff in action is that the movie is like the “Empire Strikes Back” – a middle act clearly to set up a third film.

The ending itself is the most confusing of all. Alejandro, a year after his failed assassination at the hand of a teenage gangbanger, catches up with the teen and offers to talk to him about becoming a “sicario” or “hitman”. Why? We don’t know. Presumably Alejandro, a former lawyer for a cartel, has no more cartel…So why does he need a hitman? The most plausible idea is that he would have used the kid to get to his boss. But this really isn’t explained.

This movie is hard to review. The first Sicario definitely had the script that should have been done first. But this movie provides a great contrast to the first as it’s devoid of a moral compass. Obama, not in name, is insulted as being a “weak POTUS” but that’s as political as it gets. The rest of the movie is apolitical, showing what these black ops men do and letting you decide if the cost of their work is ethical or not. But I give points to a movie that 1.) doesn’t browbeat its audience with its politics and 2.) doesn’t force touchy-feely happy scenes, because life doesn’t work like that. Soldado is bold and definitely worth a watch.

3 out of 4 stars.

 

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